Antarctica’s “Doomsday Glacier” is hanging “with its fingernails”

It is claimed that Thwaites Glacier – also known as “Doomsday Glacier”, due to the fact that it can raise sea level by several feet – is hanging “with its fingernails”.

Scientists have discovered that the base of the underwater glacier is eroding due to global warming, according to a study Published in Nature Geoscience.

“Thwaites is really sticking with its nails today,” said Robert Larter, a marine geophysicist who co-authored the study.

“And we should expect to see big changes on small time scales in the future – even from year to year – once the glacier retreats beyond a shallow rim at its bottom.”

The Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is roughly the size of Florida and could raise sea levels by about 16 feet if dropped into the ocean, which scientists speculated could lead to sea level rise. Happening within the next three years.

A new study released on Monday revealed that Antarctica’s “Doomsday Glacier” is hanging “by its fingernails.”
Reuters / NASA / Bulletin via Reuters

Researchers have monitored glacier stagnation since “as recently as the mid-20th century,” according to lead author Alistair Graham, and have recorded a rate of disintegration nearly double since the past decade.

Earlier this year, an international group of scientists Try to study the glacier In an effort to help stop the erosion, however, the group was thwarted by a piece of ice from the exhausted glacier.

The Thwaites Glacier is roughly the size of Florida and could raise sea levels about 16 feet if dropped into the ocean.
Thwaites Glacier is about the size of Florida and could raise sea level by about 16 feet if dropped into the ocean.
NASA / Zuma Wire / ZUMA24.com
According to scientists, it is likely that the glacier will fall into the sea within three years.
According to scientists, it is likely that the glacier will fall into the sea within three years.
ZUMAPRESS.com
A satellite image from the European Space Agency shows the position "Doomsday Glacier."
A satellite image from the European Space Agency showing the location of “Doomsday Glacier”.
Robert Larter/British Antarctic Survey, European Space Agency (ESA) via AP
Earlier this year, an international group of scientists attempted to study the glacier in an effort to help stop erosion.
Earlier this year, an international group of scientists attempted to study the glacier in an effort to help stop erosion.
ZUMAPRESS.com

It was “truly a once-in-a-lifetime task,” Graham stated, and he hopes the team will be able to return to the glacier soon – where scientists believe erosion was running at a slower pace before the study was published.

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“Just a small kick to the buttocks can lead to a big reaction,” Graham said.

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