SpaceX launched the Falcon Heavy from Cape Canaveral

SpaceX launched the Falcon Heavy from Cape Canaveral



Now, as I mentioned earlier, today’s launch marks the Falcon’s second heavy flight in just 11 weeks. And for those of you following along *** a lot will happen in the first four minutes of the ride and there you can see on your screen that the stabilizer arms are starting to open. Once fully unlocked, the TE can begin to retract away from the vehicle. Again, *** a lot will happen in the first four minutes of flight. We will first light the two side boosters followed by the central core at about 40 seconds after take off. We will reduce the power on the two side boosts to prepare for max Q and then the heavy falcon will return to full power on the side boosts. Now, two minutes into flight, two minutes into flight, we’ll again reduce the thrust on the two side boosters. This time to reduce the forces on the rocket structure because the vehicle is now much lighter but the thrust is constant. 2.5 minutes into the flight. We’re going to turn off the side boosters completely with the booster motor cut off or what we call the Air Separation System. Get good calls. I’ll pause for each of those, the pneumatic split system at the center core and then open the two side boosters and push them apart. Now, once we get clear, once we get off the side boosters, the center core throttles to maximum power until it shuts down and of course with the main engine cut off or what we call the Miko then breaks off the second stage around the four minute mark and as a s*** reminder, we’re not going to try to restore Center court today because the job requires more strength and performance. Now, for those of you who are looking closely, this is why you don’t see any landing legs or grille fins in the center core, and from this point on, very similar to the Falcon 9 to *** falcon 9 mission, the side boosters are going to make their way Their way to Earth in order to heal. The fairing will separate and the second stage will take the USSF 67 payload into space. Now, as a reminder *** at our client’s request, we will not be showing payload views. So we’re going to end the webcast right after our side boosters, right after our side boosters make their way back in to land in the first drop zone and drop zone to *** a little bit past the T plus eight minutes into the flight. And as mentioned before, launching is tough and the Falcon Heavy is no exception. We’re counting down to three missiles at once. So our team will be on the safe side if anything comes up in the last two minutes of the countdown. Now, for some reason we didn’t launch today, we have a *** opportunity back up tomorrow at the same time and we also heard those calls that propellant loading is now complete on the Falcon Heavy. So we are now going to vent the liquid oxygen line on the transfer device. Next up will be a Falcon in Falcon that’s heavy to start and that will be at the -1 minute T mark. This is where the flight’s internal computers take over the launch countdown. Falcon Heavy is not a startup and great news. Falcon Heavy is now up and running. We are now just waiting for the final call from the launch manager. Definitely. This is the mission manager, go for launch and excellent news. All systems ready to launch Falcon Heavy with ussF 67 T -30 seconds 15 seconds t minus 10 engine 987654321, full power and launch from USS M 67. Go Falcon Heavy, go to space power, master chamber pressure nominal T plus 40 seconds into flight. Under £5m Momentum. Falcon Heavy is heading into space. We throttled the engines around the t plus 42 mark in preparation for the maX Q. And there’s a great sign that we got through the maX Q. That’s the biggest mechanical stress on the car on the climbs. Unbelievable wonderful views are right there on your screen. The Falcon is heavy in flight. The next events will be the servo motor cut off or biko followed by the side boosters disconnect and then followed by the back burner booster side cut off and then we will be the primary prime mover cut off or what we call it. Nico. And those upcoming events here, less than a minute away, are going to be pico, which is where the booster is. The side boosters motors closing the center core will push those side boosters away from the vehicle. Then those two side boosts can start to come back down to the ground through the booster back burns and on your right hand screen you can see the views from each of those side boosters. Truly incredible views here again we’ll have biko lateral support or boost back burn followed by cutting the main engine off the primary here in just *** a few seconds separating the side booster, starting the main booster and incredible views. We just got the pico and separated the side boosters and you can see on your left hand screen that the side boosters have lit back up, and are now in a state of burning their back, making them fall back to the ground. Those side boosters are coming back to Florida with three engine power, that’s three of the nine M one D engines. So the next conclusion would be. Next would be the completion of those side burns supporting the back followed by Mikko turning the center as well as separating the stage from the center court and the second stage and then the SCS starting the engine of the first or second stage. As I mentioned earlier, at the request of our client, we will not be showing Phase II views after SCS. In addition, our Core or Phase One is depreciable today, so we’re not going to try to get that car back. But we should have some great views as we see them now, we should have some great views of the side boosters touching down.

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SpaceX launched the Falcon Heavy from Cape Canaveral

SpaceX has completed the launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket from Space Coast. With five million pounds of thrust, experts say the heavy rocket is the largest and most powerful rocket available — aside from NASA’s SLS Big Moon rocket on its first test mission. “It has the potential to put satellites into an orbit that no other rocket can come close to,” said Don Platt of Florida Tech. This makes it a much more complex missile to launch and control. “There’s a lot of engines. There’s a lot of plumbing. But there’s also more software, and there are different control algorithms that are used to make sure the missile stays on the right trajectory. So, in some aspects, it’s probably three times more difficult,” Platt said. . And one of those tricky aspects is also one of the most exciting to watch when the two side boosters land perpendicular to the first and second landing zones only. The primary booster uses all of its fuel to carry the payload outward, which is part of the reason why the Falcon Heavy is in a class on its own, as the last mission in November carried payloads for the US Space Force into deep GEO orbit. The rocket took off around 6 pm on Sunday, and the launch was a breathtaking sight. This is the fifth launch of the Falcon Heavy, and there are four more planned this year. Other headlines: Woman dies after domestic fight in Orange County Woman celebrates 113th birthday in Volusia County, deputies say Man killed, woman seriously injured in Orange County crash

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SpaceX has completed the launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket from Space Coast.

With five million pounds of thrust, experts say the heavy rocket is the largest and most powerful rocket available — aside from NASA’s SLS Big Moon rocket on its first test mission.

“It has the potential to put satellites into an orbit that no other rocket can come close to,” said Florida Tech’s Don Platt.

Basically, the heavy is three Falcon 9 boosters lined up next to each other and connected. This makes it a more complex missile to launch and control.

“There’s a lot of engines. There’s a lot of plumbing. But there’s also more software, and there are different control algorithms that are used to make sure the missile stays on the right trajectory. So, in some aspects, it’s probably three times more difficult,” Platt said.

And one of those tricky aspects is also one of the most exciting to watch when the two side boosters descend perpendicular to the first and second landing zones just seconds apart.

The primary booster uses all of its fuel to carry the payload out and that’s part of the reason the Falcon Heavy is in a class on its own.

Like the last mission in November, it carried payloads for the US Space Force into deep GEO orbit.

The rocket launched around six o’clock on Sunday evening, and the launch was a scenic sight.

This is the fifth launch of the Falcon Heavy and four more are planned for this year.

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